Organize Your Community

APAC has organized since 1980 to create a movement of powerful resident leaders who advance their vision for justice in manufactured home parks. APAC works with homeowners to identify community issues, unite neighbors around a common vision, and develop powerful leaders who can influence decision makers, set the agenda, and win real changes for their community.

Recently, homeowners have organized with APAC to:

To find out more about community organizing refer to APAC's Organizing Manual, click on the links below, or call and talk with one of our staff organizers.

Resident Associations

What is a Resident Association?

A Resident Association is a legally recognized voice for residents of manufactured home parks. According to Minnesota Statue 327C.01 subd. 9a. "Resident Association" means an organization that has the written permission of the owners of at least 51% of the manufactured homes in the park to represent them, and which is organized for the purpose of resolving matters relating to living conditions in the manufactured home park. Resident Associations can address many park wide issues by requesting necessary repairs and maintenance and improvements in health and safety conditions in the park. A Resident Association can bring park residents together and serve as an effective outlet to voice concerns and take action against unfair park rules. It can also work to pass a Park Closing Ordinance, or address other issues that affect residents of your park.

How to Form One

Step 1: Identify park concerns a Resident Association could address
Step 2: Collect signatures for Resident Association petition
Step 3: Define mission statement of the Association
Step 4: Hold Board Elections
Step 5: Approve By-laws
Step 6: Incorporate the Association
Step 7: Celebration
Step 8: Win real victories for your community!

APAC is here to help you. We can provide information, advice, and support in forming a resident association. In some cases, we can flyer the park with information and, if there is a strong interest, we can even organize an educational workshop in the park. Workshops generally cover resident rights and responsibilities as well as other questions as they come up.

Signing the agreement to join the Resident Association does not mean you must attend Resident Association meetings. it simply says that it gives the Resident Association permission to speak on park residents' behalf regarding park-wide issues. The people who sign on to the Resident Association will remain confidential. Management will not have access to the list of Resident Association members.

If you are interested in creating a Resident Association in your park or if you think there is interest in a residents' rights workshop in your area, contact APAC in the metro area at 651-644-5525 or outside the metro area at 1-855-361-2722 to find out what can be scheduled. To find out more about organizing your community refer to APAC's Organizing Manual.

Risk of Park Closings


Manufactured home parks provide one of the most important sources of affordable housing in Minnesota, providing homes to 150,000 individuals. But, as land values soar and redevelopment pressures build, parks are closing at an increasing rate. Under state law, these low-income homeowners are given only three options during a park closure: try to move the home to another park (or parcel of land) at a significant expense; leave the home where it is and pay for its demolition; or approach their municipality about adopting a park closing ordinance in order to obtain compensation. All Parks Alliance for Change (APAC) is releasing this report which looks at the vital role of parks, the impacts of closure, and the response of Minnesota cities over the last two decades.

“Manufactured home parks are a vital source of affordable housing. Many people can literally not afford to live anywhere else if their park closes,” said Dave Anderson, APAC executive director. “The closure of a park can be financially devastating for residents and most often means the loss of their homes and no where else to move within their means.” Homes are most often unmovable because of age, moving costs (averaging $5,000 to $15,000), shortage of available lots, or parks barring homes over 10 years old (71% of homes). “Owners of traditional stick-built homes are fully compensated when new development forces them to abandon their homes, but residents of parks are not,” added Anderson.

Rising land values, deferred maintenance and the desire to enlarge the local tax base increase the risk of park closures. During the last five years, the value of land has increased at a record-breaking pace in Minnesota. Prime developable real estate can sell anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 an acre. In 2003, land prices in Minnesota increased more than 12%, the fastest growth rate in the nation. In the last five years, there have been 12 park closures totaling 219 households. There are currently 5 parks in the process of closing totaling 253 more households. There are another 16 parks at risk of closure adding another 1,626 threatened households.

“On the surface, park closures due to redevelopment seem like a natural mechanism of the real estate market – a parcel of land is sold by its owner to a developer that will put it to another use. Ostensibly, the park is brought to a use that is ‘higher’ and ‘better.’ However, there is much more to the story,” said Margaret Kaplan, APAC staff attorney. “Park closures not only impact the families living in the park, but this mass displacement can also have effects on their communities and local economies, including higher demand on social services, increased homelessness, and losses to the local work force and consumer base.”

State and local governments have a vital role in addressing this problem because they license and regulate parks, and restrictively zone manufactured homes to parks. In 1987, Minnesota passed legislation allowing cities to adopt park closing ordinances. These ordinances guarantee that when a park is closed, the park owner and/or buyer will pay reasonable relocation costs to move each home within a 25-mile radius. If a home cannot be moved, the owner/buyer buys out the home at its tax assessed or appraised market value. Twenty-one cities have adopted ordinances, which leave the residents in park neighborhoods of 380 other cities unprotected.

“The goal is to allow park residents to have a sense of security. They are 80 percent low to very low income; yet they have become home owners without any kind of public subsidy. They deserve a peace of mind,” said Daren Nyquist, the reports author. “Park closing ordinances do not seek to put limitations on the transactions of private property. They are simply a tool to ensure that the property interests of the owner of the underlying land are fairly balanced against the property rights of the homeowners.”

Park closing ordinances can bring some protection to manufactured home park residents. They provide a structural guide to park closings at the local level and allow the means for residents to transition to alternative housing. Additionally, in an effort to rectify some of the consistently occurring problems related to these ordinances, a new model ordinance was drafted in 2006 and is attached to the report.

During the 2007 Minnesota Legislative Session, APAC is seeking to establish uniform statewide standards that guarantee reasonable compensation for moving costs or a home buy-out. The proposed Manufactured Home Relocation Trust Fund was introduced as House File 1205, authored by Rep. Scott Kranz (DFL-Blaine), and Senate File 1196, authored by Sen. Michael Jungbauer (R-East Bethel).

In 2006, Rep. Kranz spoke with many park homeowners in Blaine; a fast-growing north metro suburb in which 14 percent of the city’s residents live in manufactured home parks. Blaine, however, does not have a park closing ordinance. “These communities are diverse, hard working, and make valuable contributions to society,” said Rep. Kranz. “Park residents are real people that deserve peace of mind.

Policy Report - Park Closing Ordinance

Manufactured home parks provide the largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing in the state. They serve those individuals who are very low-income and provide opportunities for home ownership. These parks, however, are increasingly at risk due to rising land values, deferred maintenance, and the desire to increase the local tax base. This risk is substantial because Minnesota has approximately 950 manufactured home parks, containing nearly 50,000 homes and housing approximately 150,000 residents. Moreover, many of these parks are experiencing increased development pressures and risks of closure. To the residents of manufactured home parks, park closures mean displacement from their homes and communities, loss of affordable housing, and oppressive out-of-pocket expenses.

Owners of traditional stick-built homes are fully compensated when new development forces them to abandon their homes, but residents of parks are not. Park residents face an unusual housing situation because they own their homes but rent the land. The closing of a park can be financially devastating as it often means the loss of homes since most manufactured homes cannot be moved due to their poor condition, moving costs, shortage of available lots, and/or parks barring homes over ten years old. The closure of a park also affects the greater community, since local shelters and transitional housing facilities are already unable to cope with the increasing numbers of people needing services.

State and local governments have a vital role in addressing this problem because they license and regulate parks, restrictively zone manufactured homes to parks, adopt goals to increase minority home ownership, have plans to end homelessness, and provide services to those in need. State and local governments have the ability to pass a park closing ordinance (also known as relocation compensation ordinance) which will protect residents from the financial losses of a park closing. These ordinances provide a guarantee that when a park is closed, the park owner and/or buyer pay the reasonable relocation costs to move each home within a 25-mile radius, or if the home cannot be moved, the owner/buyer buys out the home at its taxed market value or appraised market value. Twenty-one cities have adopted ordinances leaving 90% of manufactured home parks unprotected by a park closing ordinance. This means that approximately 135,000 residents, most of whom are low-income, would lose their homes and thousands of dollars if their park were closed.

This report looks at the importance of manufactured home parks, their demographics and other substantial statistics. It explains what has created the critical need for park closing ordinances, and how park closures and ordinances affect both the manufactured home park residents and the greater community.

Housing Discrimination

This report explores various disparities based on race that exist in the lives of residents in manufactured (mobile) home parks within the State of Minnesota. Through several case studies, numerous inequalities were found between parks with predominately Latino residents and parks with non-Latino residents. Specifically, it was found that although Latino residents pay approximately the same in lot rent as non-Latino residents, the quality of parks with predominately Latino residents is drastically lower. In addition, Latino residents are more likely to experience unsatisfactory management practices and received less support from city officials.

"It is important to note that, based on the 2000 U.S. Census, 10% of park residents statewide are people of color. Taking this fact into consideration, it is disturbing to learn that 54% of the residents displaced due to park closings are people of color. It must be questioned as to why people of color are being displaced at a disproportionate rate,” said Julia Wells the report's author. “This report is a call for action to allow manufactured home parks to be communities free of disparities based on race.”

The Latino population living in manufactured home parks is both substantial and increasing. It is thought that this trend will continue, and according to census data, “Minnesota’s nonwhite and Latino populations are projected to grow significantly faster than the white population.” Based on a report by Centro Campesino and the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), 31% of migrant workers live in manufactured homes. Currently, within the 7-county metro, five percent of those who own their manufactured home are Hispanic or Latino. Clearly, Latinos have a significant presence in Minnesota as a whole, as well as within manufactured home parks explicitly.

This report looks at three case studies:

  • Bloomington, Minnesota – The city of Bloomington once included five parks: Lyndale Lodge, Collins Park, Shady Lane Court, Krestwood Mobile Home Park, and Southgate Mobile Village. Of these parks, only Krestwood and Southgate remain. It is imperative to consider the attitudes of city officials towards parks during these closings. When Lyndale Lodge closed in 1986, it prompted Bloomington to become the first city in the state to pass a park closing ordinance to guarantee relocation compensation. When Collins Park closed in 1994, the city became involved in a legal case to ensure residents received full compensation. When Shady Lane Court – a community that was overwhelmingly people of color (74%) and predominantly Latino (56%) – received closure notices in 2005, city officials did not offer support and made such statements as: “It’s time for a reality check; maybe some people can’t afford to live in Bloomington.” In addition, Krestwood Mobile Home Park and Southgate Mobile Village are owned and operated by the same management company, but have very different racial composition with 3% and 30% Latino households, respectively. These two parks reside on the same road and in the same city, but it is clear that the management disperses extremely unequal amounts of time and energy between the two parks, which are virtually identical in rent, age of homes, and homeownership rates, but dramatically different in park conditions and amenities.

  • Shakopee, Minnesota – There are four parks in the communities surrounding the city and township of Shakopee in Scott County: Bonnevista Terrace, Jackson Heights Trailer Park, Mobile Manor Park, and Valley Haven LLP. These parks reside in similar communities and are all located within five miles of one another. What make each park distinctive are the different Latino population percentages and the consequences that follow. They are 9%, 82%, 65% and 18%, respectively. Only one park (Valley Haven LLP) falls within the city boundaries of Shakopee and therefore is the only park in this community to be covered by a park closing ordinance. The remaining three parks are specifically excluded from this ordinance, even if the city were to expand its boundaries. In addition, despite lot rent differences of only twenty dollars, the Latino parks have poor park conditions and limited amenities, conditions that don’t exist in the non-Latino parks.

  • Melrose, Minnesota – There are two parks within the city limits: Melrose Mobile Home Park and Rose Park. This case study is unique due to the rural location of the city. The strongly divided racial composition that exists between these two parks allows for a well-matched comparison of various disparities present in this community. Melrose Mobile Home Park is a beautiful neighborhood; everything is well kept and nicely run. Although Rose Park’s rent is around 100% higher than Melrose Mobile Home Park, the standard of living has deteriorated due to management’s complete disregard for the residents’ well being. Some examples are inadequately maintained roads and poor drainage. The families who rent their homes and lots from management suffer most, with cockroaches and mold.

"Manufactured home park residents clearly face many disparities as a consequence of their race. In order to reduce the inexcusable disparities found in parks, some simple steps must be taken by both the municipality and the parks themselves," said Dave Anderson, APAC's executive director. "Correcting the issues covered in this report will help bring justice and equality to Latino residents. This is the first step in a long process that must be undertaken in order to reverse these widespread disparities."

Throughout Minnesota, many problems experienced by park residents fall more heavily on park communities with substantial Latino populations. APAC is working in a number of park communities around the state where Latino residents are dealing with racial harassment, unlawful evictions, illegal residency denials, steering towards parks or sections of parks with fewer amenities, and significant health and safety issues.

"Racism is not simply a matter of intentional actions by individual actors. In examining the above case studies, a more subtle form of racial injustice is revealed. Although there may not be deliberate discrimination on the part of government or private parties, the end result is stark segregation along racial lines," said Margaret Kaplan, APAC staff attorney. "Not only are parks segregated, but the quality of life in many parks are divided along racial lines and is evidence of a discriminatory impact. While it is difficult to pinpoint solutions when it is not possible to identify individual bad acts, this is no excuse for what, at a quick glance is obvious: living conditions are worse for Latino manufactured home park residents than for non-Latino residents."

Policy Report - Racial Disparities

This report explores various disparities based on race that exist in the lives of residents in manufactured (mobile) home parks within the State of Minnesota. Through several case studies, numerous inequalities were found between parks with predominately Latino residents and parks with non-Latino residents. Specifically, it was found that although Latino residents pay approximately the same in lot rent as non-Latino residents, the quality of parks with predominately Latino residents is drastically lower. In addition, Latino residents are more likely to experience unsatisfactory management practices and received less support from city officials.

"It is important to note that, based on the 2000 U.S. Census, 10% of park residents statewide are people of color. Taking this fact into consideration, it is disturbing to learn that 54% of the residents displaced due to park closings are people of color. It must be questioned as to why people of color are being displaced at a disproportionate rate,” said Julia Wells the report's author. “This report is a call for action to allow manufactured home parks to be communities free of disparities based on race.”

The Latino population living in manufactured home parks is both substantial and increasing. It is thought that this trend will continue, and according to census data, “Minnesota’s nonwhite and Latino populations are projected to grow significantly faster than the white population.” Based on a report by Centro Campesino and the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), 31% of migrant workers live in a manufactured home. Currently, within the 7-county metro, five percent of those who own their manufactured home are Hispanic or Latino. Clearly, Latinos have a significant presence in Minnesota as a whole, as well as within manufactured home parks explicitly.

This report looks at three case studies:

  • Bloomington, Minnesota – The city of Bloomington once included five parks: Lyndale Lodge, Collins Park, Shady Lane Court, Krestwood Mobile Home Park, and Southgate Mobile Village. Of these parks, only Krestwood and Southgate remain. It is imperative to consider the attitudes of city officials towards parks during these closings. When Lyndale Lodge closed in 1986, it prompted Bloomington to become the first city in the state to pass a park closing ordinance to guarantee relocation compensation. When Collins Park closed in 1994, the city became involved in a legal case to ensure residents received full compensation. When Shady Lane Court – a community that was overwhelmingly people of color (74%) and predominantly Latino (56%) – received closure notices in 2005, city officials did not offer support and made such statements as: “It’s time for a reality check; maybe some people can’t afford to live in Bloomington.” In addition, Krestwood Mobile Home Park and Southgate Mobile Village are owned and operated by the same management company, but have very different racial composition with 3% and 30% Latino households, respectively. These two parks reside on the same road and in the same city, but it is clear that the management disperses extremely unequal amounts of time and energy between the two parks, which are virtually identical in rent, age of homes, and homeownership rates, but dramatically different in park conditions and amenities.

  • Shakopee, Minnesota – There are four parks in the communities surrounding the city and township of Shakopee in Scott County: Bonnevista Terrace, Jackson Heights Trailer Park, Mobile Manor Park, and Valley Haven LLP. These parks reside in similar communities and are all located within five miles of one another. What make each park distinctive are the different Latino population percentages and the consequences that follow. They are 9%, 82%, 65% and 18%, respectively. Only one park (Valley Haven LLP) falls within the city boundaries of Shakopee and therefore is the only park in this community to be covered by a park closing ordinance. The remaining three parks are specifically excluded from this ordinance, even if the city were to expand its boundaries. In addition, despite lot rent differences of only twenty dollars, the Latino parks have poor park conditions and limited amenities, conditions that don’t exist in the non-Latino parks.

  • Melrose, Minnesota – There are two parks within the city limits: Melrose Mobile Home Park and Rose Park. This case study is unique due to the rural location of the city. The strongly divided racial composition that exists between these two parks allows for a well-matched comparison of various disparities present in this community. Melrose Mobile Home Park is a beautiful neighborhood; everything is well kept and nicely run. Although Rose Park’s rent is around 100% higher than Melrose Mobile Home Park, the standard of living has deteriorated due to management’s complete disregard for the residents’ well being. Some examples are inadequately maintained roads and poor drainage. The families who rent their homes and lots from management suffer most, with cockroaches and mold.

"Manufactured home park residents clearly face many disparities as a consequence of their race. In order to reduce the inexcusable disparities found in parks, some simple steps must be taken by both the municipality and the parks themselves," said Dave Anderson, APAC executive director. "Correcting the issues covered in this report will help bring justice and equality to Latino residents. This is the first step in a long process that must be undertaken in order to reverse these widespread disparities."

Throughout Minnesota, many problems experienced by park residents fall more heavily on park communities with substantial Latino populations. APAC is working in a number of park communities around the state where Latino residents are dealing with racial harassment, unlawful evictions, illegal residency denials, steering towards parks or sections of parks with fewer amenities and significant health and safety issues.

"Racism is not simply a matter of intentional actions by individual actors. In examining the above case studies, a more subtle form of racial injustice is revealed. Although there may not be deliberate discrimination on the part of government or private parties, the end result is stark segregation along racial lines," said Margaret Kaplan, APAC staff attorney. "Not only are park segregated, but the quality of life in many parks are divided along racial lines and is evidence of a discriminatory impact. While it is difficult to pinpoint solutions when it is not possible to identify individual bad acts, this is no excuse for what, at a quick glance is obvious: living conditions are worse for Latino manufactured home park residents than for non-Latino residents."

Mobile Justice Week

Celebrate Manufactured Home Park Week

September 24, 2006

The State of Minnesota has officially recognized the importance of manufactured (mobile) home parks through a proclamation by Governor Tim Pawlenty declaring the final week in September (24th - 30th) as "Manufactured Home Park Week." Park residents, housing advocates, and public officials geared up for a week filled with events and celebrations across the state.

"This week will help to focus statewide attention on the vital role of manufactured home parks in the state. Manufactured homes provide affordable housing and an opportunity for low-income Minnesotans to become homeowners," said Edward Landrum, former president of APAC's board of directors. "Parks are also thriving neighborhoods. They are places where people form communities, raise families, and often retire. We hope this week will help the broader public begin to see this face of parks."

Currently more than 180,000 Minnesotans live in over 900 manufactured home parks. They provide decent, safe, and affordable homeownership to families in almost every county in Minnesota. Parks present one of the largest sources of unsubsidized affordable housing in the state. With over 50,000 units of housing, manufactured home parks make up 5% of the state's overall housing
stock.

APAC expects "Park Week" to raise the public awareness of manufactured home parks and their importance as a source for homeownership and affordable housing. "Park Week" also sheds light on the increasing trend in the number of manufactured home park neighborhoods that have been demolished for redevelopment. At the local level, APAC and residents from parks across the state have been working to engage local public officials to commit resources to safeguard residents from the threat of redevelopment. On April 1st, 2006, Shady Lane Mobile Home Park, located in the city of Bloomington, closed due to redevelopment and consequently 50 families were displaced.

"Park Week is about Mobile Justice," said Ned Moore, Park Week Coordinator at All Parks Alliance for Change. "In the past 6 years, 15 mobile home parks have closed in the State of Minnesota. We are losing more parks every year, and hundreds of families are losing their homes."

Organizing Manual (and Fundraising Manual)


Free Organizing Manual Now Available!

The much anticipated APAC Community Organizing Manual is now available online for printing and distribution. This manual is a collection of original and modified organizing materials specifically designed for use in manufactured home park organizing efforts. These materials are not only for homeowners and homeowner associations, but for nonprofit professionals to better understand resident concerns and how to effectively work with them, including housing and consumer advocates, public interest law firms, community housing development organizations, and others. Download sections as needed and call with any questions you may have!

This organizing manual can be used and distributed individually or collectively; however, some material is based on concepts presented in previous sections. The downloadable sections are as follows:

1) Introduction & Table of Contents
2) Organizing
3) Leadership
4) Resident Associations
5) Park Prejudice
6) Racial Justice
7) Media and Messaging
8) Policy

Additionally, see our Fundraising Supplement to the Organizing Manual.

Transportation and Your Community


Who makes decisions about transportation?

Transportation in Minnesota is overseen by the Minnesota Department of Transportation, a cabinet-level agency of the state government. MnDOT is responsible for planning, developing, and maintaining systems of ground, water, and air transportation. The Metropolitan Council also has a significant role in transportation (particularly in the seven-county metro area) since the state's principle airport and almost all north-south through railroads and long-distance four-lane freeways in Minnesota go to or through the Twin Cities.

Launched in January 2011, Corridors of Opportunity is a broad-based initiative involving state, regional and local government, philanthropy, non-profit organizations, and business. It is focused on accelerating the development of the region’s transit system and providing new opportunities for nearby development to connect people of all incomes and backgrounds to jobs, housing choices, recreation and services. One goal of this initiative is to ensure that all residents — particularly underrepresented and marginalized communities (low-income, communities of color, immigrant communities, persons with disabilities) — participate in transitway planning.



[Click on map to enlarge image]


How can transit planning effect manufactured homeowners?

There are a number of impacts transit planning may have on manufactured homeowners, if the planning process reflects your needs and concerns.

Transit takes pressure off of transportation development

  • For an example, in the 1950’s the development of the Rondo neighborhood that went through gentrification and an intrusion of a highway (I – 94) displaced over 10,000 people.
  • At present, many areas with manufactured home parks have also gone through urban renewal and redevelopment project Ex. (input manufactured home park here)

The use of transit may enrich your life and meet basic needs of transportation

  • Work places, school, shopping districts, expanding your communication with your community
  • Connecting with opportunities in a larger community

Getting Your Voice Heard

  • Overcome the park prejudice & stereotypes that has been developed over the years by becoming civically engaged
  • Get involved with transit meetings to have a hand in where future stops should be planted


How to get involved

  • Stay up to date with Rush Line Corridor, Gateway Corridor, and Red Rock Corridor meetings, which can be found on their web pages or possibly in APAC's calendar located on the right hand side of this page.
  • Come to APAC community meetings where we will also find time to discuss how transit and you, as a manufactured park homeowner, can give your opinions and ideas.

MnDOT Seeks Input from Highway 169 Users

Highway 169 Mobility Study



If you are a park resident who lives or works in the west Twin Cities metro area, the Minnesota Department of Transportation is seeking input on how mobility and transit options can be improved on Highway 169. This information will help MnDOT make decisions about the future design and operation of Highway 169. All participants who complete this survey will have a chance to win one of two $25 VISA gift cards.

Your feedback is needed!

Participate in the survey online.

For additional information, here is the link to the study website.

REPORT: Resident Opinions on the Rush Line Corridor


Rush Line Corridor:
Connecting Manufactured Home Parks to Opportunities

Download a Copy (CLICK HERE)

Download a PowerPoint Version Copy (CLICK HERE)

The Rush Line Corridor is an 80-mile travel corridor between St. Paul and Hinckley, consisting of 23 urban, suburban and rural communities linked by a common need to be mobile and connected. The Rush Line Corridor Task Force is a 23-member board of city, county and township elected officials. The task force is now conducting a Pre-Project Development (PPD) Study to analyze bus and rail alternatives within the 30-mile segment between Forest Lake and Union Depot in downtown St. Paul.

As the planning process develops, the transit habits and potential needs of people living in manufactured homes along the corridor should be considered. The full corridor runs through 10 cities with 27 park communities and 2,779 households. The 30-mile segment under review run through five cities (Forest Lake, Hugo, Little Canada, Maplewood, and Vadnais Heights) with 8 parks and 1,133 households. This is generally a marginalized group of people with low incomes and limited access to resources.

The Rush Line project could be a boon for residents, depending on stop placement, route, and type of transit. The research report has two parts: an analysis of 2013 5-year American Community Survey (ACS) data on resident transportation uses along the proposed transit corridor, and a survey of residents regarding their needs, opinions, and what would encourage residents to use public transportation in the future.

Rush Line Corridor

What is the Rush Line Corridor?

The Rush Line corridor is an 80 mile distance between Hinckley and St. Paul slated for increased public transit service. The 24-member Rush Line Corridor Task Force has been assembled to examine the options available to expand transit based economic development, community preservation, and environmental protection. The Rush Line Corridor ultimately connects suburban communities and rural cities with metropolitan areas.

Proposed Rush Line Route

How does the Rush Line Corridor affect manufactured home park residents?

Transit based development in the area can provide much needed access to employment and local businesses at a much lower cost for consumers. The Rush Line Corridor has the potential to benefit manufactured home park residents in several ways, however, the short answer is that it’s up to you. Public involvement within the manufactured home park community along the proposed Rush Line Corridor is an essential component in maximizing the positive affect for residents. The population along the corridor is expected to increase by 43% between 2000 and 2030. Learn more about the Rush Line Corridor

How do I get involved?

Regardless of the method you choose, you must get involved in the Rush Line initiative as your participation is essential in shaping the direction of the project. Conventional and creative opportunities will be available for residents to participate in the Rush Line planning process. Traditional options include open houses at existing transit centers whereas more creative methods include web-based feedback. Please visit Rush Lines get involved page or contact APAC for additional details. Get Involved!